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SCG Phl donates negative pressure mobile isolation units to public hospitals

SCG donated one negative pressure mobile isolation unit each to the Lung Center of the Philippines, Sta. Ana Hospital and Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital last week in time for the shift of Metro Manila to General Community Quarantine (GCQ) on June 1.

SCG Philippines turned over negative pressure mobile isolation units to three major hospitals in Metro Manila to support medical frontliners in the continued fight against COVID-19. The equipment help prevent the spread of the virus through controlled air pressure technology.

SCG donated one negative pressure mobile isolation unit each to the Lung Center of the Philippines, Sta. Ana Hospital and Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in time for the shift of Metro Manila to General Community Quarantine (GCQ).

“The threat of COVID-19 in the Philippines is still serious. While the nation is transitioning to a ‘new normal,’ our medical frontliners are still fighting the same battle and face very high risks. To show our continued support to these frontliners, we have donated negative pressure mobile isolation units to three major hospitals in Metro Manila. Let’s all do our part to stay safe and healthy by continuing to practice social distancing,” said SCG Assistant Country Director to the Philippines Emilie Maramag.

Lung Center of the Philippines Executive Director Dr. Vincent Balanag Jr. shared, “The negative pressure mobile isolation unit will be extremely helpful to increase our capacity to keep our frontliners safe and to provide our patients with the optimum treatment they need. We are grateful that SCG chose to include the Philippines as one of the recipients of this donation.”

A negative pressure mobile isolation unit operates under negative pressure, allowing the air to flow in and out of the room through a pressure-controlled system and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) air filter. Designed and developed by SCG engineers together with medical professionals, the equipment is compact and easily adjusted to fit the target space. Its installation and dismantling take only 30 minutes. 

The negative pressure mobile isolation unit is made of heavy-duty metal covered with canvas and PVC plastic and is divided into two areas. The inner area is for patients and is equipped with double doors and a two-way zipper to facilitate medical procedures. The outer area is the frontliners’ changing zone and can be used for infectious waste disposal. 

Negative pressure mobile isolation units help prevent the spread of COVID-19 by controlling the escape of microorganisms from the isolation areas. These rooms use low pressure to suck the air inside the quarantine section and filter the air to control the movement of airborne pollutants. They also reduce the possible contamination of the adjacent corridors, protecting frontliners and patients from the threat of the virus.

“We consider the Philippines as part of our ASEAN family and as a family, we aim for everyone’s safety. We are pleased to collaborate with SCG Philippines and Mariwasa in providing negative pressure mobile isolation units to Philippine hospitals. On behalf of the Thai government, our people, SCG Philippines and Mariwasa, we hope that this donation will aid our frontliners in our fight against COVID-19. We will win this battle together, ” said Thai Ambassador to the Philippines Vasin Ruangprateepsaeng.

SCG hopes to extend the assistance to more institutions. A similar initiative was conducted in other countries where SCG operates.

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