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Getting the support you need before and after pregnancy

Support is important during and after pregnancy for the physical and emotional health of the mother and her baby. Here are good ways to find the shoulder you need and lean on it.

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Pregnancy is a crucial stage in every woman’s life. She experiences significant changes in her body, physically and mentally. You may not always be prepared for what comes your way, and you will need a support system to help you get through these changes well.

Support is important during and after pregnancy for the physical and emotional health of the mother and her baby. Here are good ways to find the shoulder you need and lean on it.

Pregnant Moms Support Groups

This is probably the first thing that comes in mind when you think about pregnancy and support. Pregnancy support groups are actually a great way of getting all the information and help you will need to get through your pregnancy.  Support groups like these are made up of pregnant women like you who are going through the same experiences and changes.  You get to discuss issues surrounding your pregnancy, any problems you may be facing and how to solve them. 

 If you are a first-time mum, you will find these groups incredibly helpful in assisting you to cope with the situation, find the best ways to make your pregnancy a pleasant experience and anticipate the birth of your child.  Being a first-time mum can be very overwhelming, primarily because of all the changes that occur physically and emotionally. While your close friends, family and partner may do their best to be there for you, they may never really understand how to help you. Not as much as the pregnant women in your group will. Ask around, and you’ll probably find one such group in your neighbourhood. If there isn’t, you can always start one!

Professional Support

Most people only think of getting professional emotional support when they are going through something serious like mental illness or depression. It is, however, essential to understand that psychologists and psychiatrists are there not just to treat mental illness, depression, anxiety and stress but also to offer emotional and mental support to those who need it.

Take a look through your local network of doctors and professionals( or shrinks, as some people prefer to call them), and you’ll likely find some who can offer invaluable prenatal and postnatal support for your situation in particular.  The ideal doctor would be a woman who has been pregnant before, but it should not come as a surprise if a man or a woman who hasn’t been pregnant before offers you support.

Here you can confide in them and tell them everything that is bothering you in both physical and emotional aspects, and they will, in turn,  help you find solutions and give you much-needed advice to get through your pregnancy.  Professional support is necessary before and after birth. 

Family and Experienced Women

Sometimes but the best advice comes from people who have been where you are. It could be your mother, sister, neighbour, co-worker, friend or any other woman who has been pregnant before. Make use of this network of women to get the emotional support you need.  They can give you priceless advice and tips on things that may not be known commonly. 

Your mother may learn a trick to help with morning sickness or back pain.  Your sister could show you a nice place to get food that is healthy and friendly for pregnant women. The neighbor may show you a nice store to get baby prams at a low price. Sometimes we need them to be there and listen. They may even help you get through any anxiety or stress you may experience, such as the fear of painful delivery that is very common amongst pregnant women, especially those in the third trimester. 

Online programs and sites

The internet is not always a bad place to seek advice. There’s plenty of programs designed to support pregnant women. There are lots of resources, some posted by the government and others by various web sites with information to answer any questions you may need regarding your pregnancy. All you have to do is reach out.

Some of these internet platforms provide factual information regarding pre and postnatal care. Some may offer to counsel while others give information on specific aspects such as the trimesters, postnatal healing and care and tips to help you handle your baby in the first few days. Others have forums where women participate and give opinions, reviews on products or simply as questions to get answers. You only need to make sure that you are dealing with a reputable source that provides factual and verified information. Also, be careful not to disclose sensitive personal information to strangers who may use it for illegal purposes.

Your partner

The closest source of support ad comfort should be your partner. They should be available to offer all the emotional support you need. If possible, they should be able to take a break from work, even if just a short one, to help you get through the challenging parts of your pregnancy, such as labour. Your partner should also be someone you can talk to whenever you feel tensed all depressed so you can find solutions together and ease your mind.

In conclusion, there are plenty of places you can seek support as you go through your pregnancy. The best place would be amongst women who have been there before. They can share experiences and help you discover tips and tricks to make the whole experience more pleasant. If you feel like you need specialized emotional support, do not be ashamed to consult with a professional. Remember your mental and physical health are paramount for the healthy growth and development of the baby.

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Online menus should put healthy food first

Women who see healthy food at the top of an online menu are 30 to 40 percent more likely to order it, a Flinders University study has found, with the authors saying menu placement could play a role in encouraging healthier eating.

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Photo by Drahomír Posteby-Mach from Unsplash.com

Women who see healthy food at the top of an online menu are 30 to 40 percent more likely to order it, a Flinders University study has found, with the authors saying menu placement could play a role in encouraging healthier eating.

Published in the journal Appetite and led by Flinders University PhD Candidate Indah Gynell, the team investigated where on a menu healthy items should be placed to best encourage people to choose them.

“Previous research has explored menu placement before, but the studies were inconsistent, with some finding placing food items at the top and bottom of a menu increased their popularity, while others suggested that the middle is best,” said Ms Gynell from Flinders’ College of Education, Psychology and Social Work.

“In our study we compared three locations on both printed and online menus, with online being an important addition in the age of food ordering platforms, such as UberEats and Menulog, especially during the pandemic.”

The researchers created menus containing eight unhealthy items and four healthy items, arranged in three rows of four on the physical printed menu and in one column of 12 on the digital menu. In one study, the physical menu was tested on 172 female participants, while in the second study, the digital menu was tested on 182 female participants.

Female participants were chosen as previous research has found that dieting behaviours – likely to impact menu choice – are consistently more prevalent in women.

Participants then chose an item from one of the experimental menus before completing a psychological test that identified their ‘dietary restraint status’; that is whether or not they were actively choosing to restrict their eating habits for the purpose of health or weight loss.

“We found that neither the order of food items, nor participants’ dietary restraint status, impacted whether or not healthy food was chosen in the physical menus,” says Ms Gynell.

“However, for the online menus, we found that participants who saw healthy items at the top of an online menu were 30-40% more likely to choose a healthy item than those who viewed them further down the menu.”

The authors say the finding is important because if added up over time, consistent healthy choices could result in general health benefits at a population level, highlighting why such an intervention could be worth implementing.

“Diet-related illnesses and disease are more common now than ever before, and with a rise in online food ordering it’s important we uncover cost-effective and simple public health initiatives,” says Ms Gynell.

“Changing the order of a menu, which doesn’t require the addition or removal of items, is unlikely to impact profits as consumers are guided towards healthier options without being discouraged from purchasing altogether.

“This means it’s more likely to be accepted by food purveyors and, despite being a somewhat simple solution, has the potential to shape real-world healthy eating interventions.”

The effect of item placement on snack food choices from physical and online menus by Indah Gynell, Eva Kemps, Ivanka Prichard and Marika Tiggemann is published in the journal Appetite.

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Serving larger portions of veggies may increase young kids’ veggie consumption

The researchers found that while the larger portions of vegetables were associated with greater intake, the addition of butter and salt was not. The children also reported liking both versions — seasoned and unseasoned — about the same. About 76% of kids rated the vegetables as “yummy” or “just ok.”

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Photo by Nadine Primeau from Unsplash.com

It can be difficult to get young kids to eat enough vegetables, but a new Penn State study found that simply adding more veggies to their plates resulted in children consuming more vegetables at the meal.

The researchers found that when they doubled the amount of corn and broccoli served at a meal — from 60 to 120 grams — the children ate 68% more of the veggies, or an additional 21 grams. Seasoning the vegetables with butter and salt, however, did not affect consumption.

The daily recommended amount of vegetables for kids is about 1.5 cups a day, according to the official Dietary Guidelines for Americans as set by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services.

“The increase we observed is equal to about one third of a serving or 12% of the daily recommended intake for young children,” said Hanim Diktas, graduate student in nutritional sciences. “Using this strategy may be useful to parents, caregivers and teachers who are trying to encourage kids to eat the recommended amount of vegetables throughout the day.”

Barbara Rolls, Helen A. Guthrie Chair and director of the Laboratory for the Study of Human Ingestive Behavior at Penn State, said the findings — recently published in the journal Appetite — support the MyPlate guidance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which recommends meals high in fruits and vegetables.

“It’s important to serve your kids a lot of vegetables, but it’s also important to serve them ones they like because they have to compete with the other foods on the plate,” Rolls said. “Parents can ease into this by gradually exposing kids to new vegetables, cooking them in a way their child enjoys, and experimenting with different flavors and seasonings as you familiarize them.”

According to the researchers, the majority of children in the U.S. don’t eat the recommended daily amount of vegetables, which could possibly be explained by children having a low preference for them. And while serving larger portions has been found to increase the amount of food children eat — called the “portion size effect” — kids tend to eat smaller amounts of vegetables in response to bigger portions compared to other foods.

For this study, the researchers were curious if increasing just the amount of vegetables while keeping the portions of other foods the same would help increase veggie consumption in kids. They also wanted to experiment with whether adding light butter and salt to the vegetables would increase their palatability and also affect consumption.

For the study, the researchers recruited 67 children between the ages of three and five. Once a week for four weeks, the participants were served lunch with one of four different preparations of vegetables: a regular-sized serving of plain corn and broccoli, a regular-sized serving with added butter and salt, a doubled serving of plain corn and broccoli, and a doubled serving with added butter and salt.

During each meal, the vegetables were served alongside fish sticks, rice, applesauce and milk. Foods were weighed before and after the meal to measure consumption.

“We chose foods that were generally well-liked but also not the kids’ favorite foods,” Rolls said. “If you offer vegetables alongside, say, chicken nuggets you might be disappointed. Food pairings are something you need to be conscious of, because how palpable the vegetables are compared to the other foods on the plate is going to affect the response to portion size. You need to make sure your vegetables taste pretty good compared to the other foods.”

After analyzing the results, the researchers found that while the larger portions of vegetables were associated with greater intake, the addition of butter and salt was not. The children also reported liking both versions — seasoned and unseasoned — about the same. About 76% of kids rated the vegetables as “yummy” or “just ok.”

“We were surprised that the butter and salt weren’t needed to improve intake, but the vegetables we served were corn and broccoli, which may have been already familiar to and well-liked by the kids,” Diktas said. “So for less familiar vegetables, it’s possible some extra flavoring might help to increase intake.”

Diktas said that while serving larger portions may increase vegetable consumption, it also has the potential to increase waste if kids don’t eat all of the food that is served.

“We’re working on additional research that looks into substituting vegetables for other food instead of just adding more vegetables,” Diktas said. “In the future, we may be able to give recommendations about portion size and substituting vegetables for other foods, so we can both limit waste and promote veggie intake in children.”

Liane Roe, research nutritionist; Kathleen Keller, associate professor of nutritional sciences; and Christine Sanchez, lab manager at the Laboratory for the Study of Human Ingestive Behavior, also participated in this work.

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Study shows potential dangers of sweeteners

At a concentration equivalent to two cans of diet soft drink, all three artificial sweeteners significantly increased the adhesion of both E. coli and E. faecalis to intestinal Caco-2 cells, and differentially increased the formation of biofilms.

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Photo by Artem Podrez from Pexels.com

New research has discovered that common artificial sweeteners can cause previously healthy gut bacteria to become diseased and invade the gut wall, potentially leading to serious health issues.

The study, published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, is the first to show the pathogenic effects of some of the most widely used artificial sweeteners – saccharin, sucralose, and aspartame – on two types of gut bacteria, E. coli (Escherichia coli) and E. faecalis (Enterococcus faecalis).

Previous studies have shown that artificial sweeteners can change the number and type of bacteria in the gut, but this new molecular research, led by academics from Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), has demonstrated that sweeteners can also make the bacteria pathogenic. It found that these pathogenic bacteria can attach themselves to, invade, and kill Caco-2 cells, which are epithelial cells that line the wall of the intestine.

It is known that bacteria such as E. faecalis which cross the intestinal wall can enter the blood stream and congregate in the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen, causing a number of infections including septicaemia.

This new study discovered that at a concentration equivalent to two cans of diet soft drink, all three artificial sweeteners significantly increased the adhesion of both E. coli and E. faecalis to intestinal Caco-2 cells, and differentially increased the formation of biofilms.

Bacteria growing in biofilms are less sensitive to antimicrobial resistance treatment and are more likely to secrete toxins and express virulence factors, which are molecules that can cause disease.

Additionally, all three sweeteners caused the pathogenic gut bacteria to invade Caco-2 cells found in the wall of the intestine, with the exception of saccharin which had no significant effect on E. coli invasion.

Senior author of the paper Dr Havovi Chichger, Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Science at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), said: “There is a lot of concern about the consumption of artificial sweeteners, with some studies showing that sweeteners can affect the layer of bacteria which support the gut, known as the gut microbiota.

“Our study is the first to show that some of the sweeteners most commonly found in food and drink – saccharin, sucralose and aspartame – can make normal and ‘healthy’ gut bacteria become pathogenic. These pathogenic changes include greater formation of biofilms and increased adhesion and invasion of bacteria into human gut cells.

“These changes could lead to our own gut bacteria invading and causing damage to our intestine, which can be linked to infection, sepsis and multiple-organ failure.

“We know that overconsumption of sugar is a major factor in the development of conditions such as obesity and diabetes. Therefore, it is important that we increase our knowledge of sweeteners versus sugars in the diet to better understand the impact on our health.”

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