Fitness

5 Ways to find your morning workout motivation

Finding the motivation to get up and work out first thing can be a huge hurdle. If you’re looking to make your early workout successful and one you’ll actually stick with, consider these tips.

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For many people, hitting the gym in the morning leaves less time for excuses or interferences.

However, finding the motivation to get up and work out first thing can be a huge hurdle. If you’re looking to make your early workout successful and one you’ll actually stick with, consider these tips.

  1. Get Out of Bed, No Matter What – Making the first move may be the hardest part. Try setting two alarms and keeping them away from your bed. Walking across the room immediately after your alarm sounds gets you up and helps deter you from pressing snooze. Even sleeping in your (clean) workout clothes can make it easier to get going once you’re up.
  2. Find a Workout Buddy – Having a partner can be motivational and help hold you accountable. It’s oftentimes easier to push through a tough workout when someone else is keeping you in check.
  3. Commit to a Class – There are many ways to work out in the morning, and it’s up to you to decide what kind of exercise is best suited for your fitness goals. Consider the potential benefits of a scheduled class: working out with a group gives you an appointment to keep, a set time and place and an instructor and team to push and encourage you even when you feel like giving up.
  4. Refuel for the Day (and Workouts) Ahead – Post-workout nutrition is critical to refueling your body after a tough workout, allowing you to take on the day ahead. Try lowfat chocolate milk. Its carb-to-protein ratio has been scientifically shown to effectively refuel exhausted muscles. The sugar in chocolate milk is the secret to its ratio, one that elite athletes have trusted for years. And you may be surprised to learn that chocolate milk also naturally contains the same electrolytes added to commercial sports drinks.
  5. Give Yourself a Break – Keep in mind that after exhaustive endurance exercise, your body needs rest time (24-48 hours) to adequately replace your depleted glycogen stores. Take some time to let your body and mind prep for the next workout.

For additional workout and recovery inspiration, visit BuiltWithChocolateMilk.com.

 

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