Veepo Global Resources Inc.: Providing Clear Waters

The Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council estimates that over one billion people, or one-sixth of the world’s total population, do not have access to safe drinking water. In fact, in select places in Asia and Africa, people have to walk an average distance of six kilometers to collect water, subsequently carrying an average water weight of anything up to 20 kilograms on their heads. What can only be worse is that according to the World Health Organization (WHO), half of the world’s poor suffer from waterborne diseases, with nearly 6,000 people – mainly children – dying each day by consuming unsafe drinking water.

In the Philippines, “vector-borne diseases, such as malaria and dengue, have been major public concerns. According to a WHO report, there were 124,152 estimated cases of malaria in the country for 2008; and dengue, on the other hand, infects 20 per 100,000 Filipinos annually, as reported by the National Demographic and Health Survey,” notes Veepo Global resources Inc., a company into “providing life-saving and innovative solutions to help improve the health and wellbeing of people.”

That “infectious diseases are a burden to our society is an understatement,” the company adds, noting how even today, diarrheal infections brought about by drinking unsafe water is the third leading cause of death among children under the age of five worldwide, and in the Philippines, is the leading cause of morbidity.

“Safe water interventions have vast potential to transform lives,” Erwin Po, Veepo Global Resources Inc. president, was quoted as saying by Enterprise Magazine, adding that “prevention is still the best way to manage infectious diseases.”

It is with this intention that the company introduced in the Philippines the LifeStraw water purifiers, developed by Vestergaard-Frandsen, the Swiss company known for its technologically advanced life-saving and innovative diseases control products, as a “practical way of preventing diseases and saving lives, as well as achieving the Millennium Development Goal of reducing by one-haf the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe water by the year 2015.”

LifeStraw includes LifeStraw Personal and LifeStraw Family – with the former filtering a minimum of 700 liters of water, good for use by a single person for at least a year; and the latter filtering a minimum of 18,000 liters of water to provide safe drinking water for a family for more than two years. Both models remove 99.9999% of water-borne bacteria, 99.99% of virus, and 99.99% of parasites.

The worldchanging.com tells how LifeStra works, i.e.: Powered by regular sucking (similar to using traditional drinking straws), LifeStraw Personal, a plastic tube that is 31 centimeters long and 30 millimeters in diameter, allows for the passing of water through a mesh of 100-micrometer space, then through another mesh of 15-micrometer spaces, and then through a chamber of iodine-coated beads to further kill remaining bacteria not removed by the two meshes, before finally passing through active carbon to remove the idodine taste and the medium-sized bacteria.

“Safe water interventions have vast potential to transform the lives of millions of people. Water filtration tools not only provide safe drinking water but also have a positive health impact on the most vulnerable populations,” states Veepo Global Resources Inc.

LifeStraw is considered as “One of the 10 things that will change the way we live” by Forbes Magazine.

For more information, call (+63 2) 8976391, or visit vestergaard-frandsen.com, lifestraw.com, permanent.com, or veepo.net.

 

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