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JP Marzan Project Ventures Inc. eyes to help Phl grow its economy while building sustainability

For JP Marzan Project Ventures, Inc., one of the country’s major logistics companies, efficient logistics can help solve challenges, especially with the robust construction activities.

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As a country composed of over 7,641 islands, the Philippines will always be plagued with geographic challenges. Transporting equipment and construction materials remain an issue, not only for the infrastructure industry but also for businesses in all sectors.

For JP Marzan Project Ventures, Inc., one of the country’s major logistics companies, efficient logistics can help solve these challenges, especially with the robust construction activities. With numerous infrastructure projects still in the pipeline, opportunities for companies offering specialized logistics services are ripe for the taking, as it offers expertise to local builders and the government.

The logistics in infrastructure

JP Marzan Project Ventures, Inc.’s Jay Marzan, chairman, said that the government’s focus on its infrastructure projects gives a promising future for the logistics industry. With its expertise, the company aims to help the government can fulfill its goal of improving the country’s economy.

JP Marzan Project Ventures, Inc. is present in some of the major projects in the country. For example, they are responsible for the delivery of girders for the building of skyways, and they are also working closely with its partners for the Manila subway project.

“The best solution for the government is to work closely with logistics companies, thus making the construction projects around the country more efficient and finish faster,” Marzan said. “As for us, we are ready to show how logistics can help through intensive research.”

Before closing a deal with its partners, JP Marzan Project Ventures, Inc. makes it a point to conduct surveys and researches to assess whether they can execute the project, given the difficulty of the task, as well as the risk factors that surround it. This mindset has led to their service offerings to expand and cater to the needs of builders and organizations across the country. 

Among its services include heavy-lift support, trucking, forwarding, logistics, domestic distribution, warehousing, rigging works, plant transfer, factory machine installation, powerplant assembly, project consultation, equipment rental, civil engineering, and trading of industrial equipment and services.

“All the research is necessary not just for the quality of the services we offer but also for the safety of our experts and workers. In our kind of business, there is no room for accidents and so, we always ensure due diligence in doing our projects,” Marzan added. 

For instance, the preparation they need to do to facilitate the delivery of turbines, which could weigh about 160 on average and cost millions of dollars. That is why they need highly skilled drivers, as well due to the deliveries they need to make. 

Another project was the transportation of the train coaches for the MRT-7 project, which required specialized trucks to deliver. This project is one of the company’s ways of showing its commitment to nation-building by helping to provide Filipinos good and efficient transportation. 

Continuing the progress

JP Marzan Project Ventures, Inc. and the government have one goal in common and that is to ensure that the economy flourishes and competes globally at a high level. With the government’s infrastructure push, the company expects more opportunities not just in NCR but also in other regions in need of logistics services.

Regions like Bicol in 2017 had infrastructure boom, and most of the growth that happened there was credited to the logistics services. The province became the fastest-growing region in the country with multiple sectors like agriculture, trade, and commercial having an uptick performance. 

The latest Logistics Performance Index (LPI) 2018 revealed that the Philippines rank 60th from 71st in 2016. LPI also indicated that the country scored from 2.55 to 2.73 in infrastructure while 2.70 to 2.78 in logistics competence for the same period, respectively.

“It only goes to show the importance of both industries and the need for them to grow even more,” Marzan said. “We hope to continue the country’s progress in infrastructures and transportations. To date, we have established our corporate center in Carmona, Cavite as a way of showing our support for our partners, who are mostly in the southern part of Luzon.”

The corporate center is accessible from Manila and, has enough parking space and easy deployment for trucks. It has an estimated development cost of Php30million to Php32million. The company expects to move there in December this year.

Working together for the country

However, the entire world has been recently consumed to a dangerous pandemic, the Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) put everybody’s lives in danger and caused considerable damage to the world economy. The Philippines is not exempted from the damages, especially that the government decided to put the entire Luzon in enhanced community quarantine from March 15 to April 14.

“We are ready to serve and help the country rise from the pandemic because we are hopeful that when all our partners’ infrastructure projects are finished, it will bring good news for the country and give witness to a beautiful transformation,” Marzan added.

As one of the country’s leading logistics providers, JP Marzan Project Ventures, Inc. is dedicated to meet the challenges of the globalized market and serves as a reliable partner for the country’s economic growth.

The company started in 1972 as RV Marzan Brokerage and used to handle customs brokerage and deliveries around Luzon. Since then, it started the separate logistics company, we know today and has established itself as a reputable logistics company consistent with the best business practices. 

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Alsons Dev welcomes The Abba’s Orchard to Avia Estate

The country’s largest and most esteemed network of authentic Montessori schools, The Abba’s Orchard, breaks ground on June 14 for its 15th campus located in Avia Estate, a township project in Alabel, Sarangani by Alsons Development and Investment Corporation (Alsons Dev).

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The country’s largest and most esteemed network of authentic Montessori schools, The Abba’s Orchard, breaks ground on June 14 for its 15th campus located in Avia Estate, a township project in Alabel, Sarangani by Alsons Development and Investment Corporation (Alsons Dev).

The expansion reflects the school’s mission of “Discover True Montessori Philippines,” offering high-quality education in the SOCCSKSARGEN Region—a mission that aligns with Alsons Dev’s vision to offer vibrant live-work-play-learn communities where families and businesses can thrive. Recognizing this shared purpose, Alsons Dev partnered with The Abba’s Orchard, contributing a substantial two hectares of land within Avia Estate to make the school a reality.

“We at Alsons Dev are thrilled to partner with The Abba’s Orchard in bringing this exceptional learning environment to Alabel,” said Miguel Dominguez, Alsons Dev Director. “This collaboration aligns with our commitment to fostering growth and development within SOCCSKSARGEN.”

Discover how Avia Estate can let you live your best life. For more information about Avia Estate, visit facebook.com/AviaEstate.

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Optimism wards off procrastination

While procrastinators often admonish themselves for their “bad habit,” it turns out that their worries for the future are more to blame.

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People with an optimistic outlook on the future are less likely to be severe procrastinators, according to new research at the University of Tokyo. While procrastinators often admonish themselves for their “bad habit,” it turns out that their worries for the future are more to blame. Through a survey of nearly 300 young people, researchers found that those who had a positive view about their stress levels decreasing in the future, compared to the past or present, were less likely to experience severe procrastination. Views on personal well-being didn’t appear to have an effect. Improving people’s outlook and readiness for the future could help them overcome procrastination and achieve a less stressful lifestyle. 

How many times have you made a “to do” list, and although the most important task is at the top, you seem to be working your way up from the bottom or distracted by something else entirely? While we might chide ourselves for procrastinating, sometimes the more we try to overcome it, the more stressed we feel and the cycle continues. That is how it was for graduate student Saya Kashiwakura from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Tokyo, so she decided to investigate why.

“I have struggled with procrastination since childhood. I would clean my room when I needed to study for a test and prioritize aikido practice over my postgraduate research. This habit of putting off important tasks has been a constant challenge,” said Kashiwakura. “I wanted to change my behavior, as I realized that I was not confronting the future impact of my actions.”

This inspired Kashiwakura to examine the relationship between procrastination and the procrastinator’s perspective on time, particularly their view of the future. When she began researching procrastination, she was surprised to discover that many more people suffer from it than she had imagined and found it reassuring her problems were not unique.

Previous research has shown that a feature of procrastination is disregard for the future or difficulty linking present actions with future outcomes. However, the reasons for this have been unclear. Kashiwakura and co-author Professor Kazuo Hiraki, also from UTokyo, proposed that it might be because severe procrastinators have a more pessimistic outlook. 

The researchers surveyed 296 participants in Japan in their 20s for their views on stress and well-being, and importantly how these changed over time. This included asking about their experiences from 10 years in the past through to the present, and their expectations for 10 years in the future. From the results, participants were clustered into one of four groups (for example, if they thought their situation would improve or would stay the same), and then each group was divided into severe, middle and low procrastinators. 

“Our research showed that optimistic people — those who believe that stress does not increase as we move into the future — are less likely to have severe procrastination habits,” explained Kashiwakura. “This finding helped me adopt a more light-hearted perspective on the future, leading to a more direct view and reduced procrastination.” 

It was not only the level of stress people experienced, but how their perception of it changed over the 20-year time period discussed, which influenced their procrastination habits. Surprisingly, a relationship wasn’t found between procrastination and negative views on well-being, such as one’s attitude towards oneself, or not yet finding purpose and goals in life.

Using these results, the team wants to develop ways to help people nurture a more optimistic mindset and overcome procrastination. “We hope our findings will be particularly useful in the education sector. We believe that students will achieve better outcomes and experience greater well-being when they can comprehend their procrastination tendencies scientifically, and actively work on improving them, rather than blaming themselves,” said Kashiwakura. 

“Thoughts can change with just a few minutes of watching a video or be shaped by years of accumulation. Our next step is to investigate which approach is appropriate this time, and how we can develop the ‘right’ mindset to lead a happier and more fulfilling life.”

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Study shows how night shift work can raise risk of diabetes, obesity

“When internal rhythms are dysregulated, you have this enduring stress in your system that we believe has long-term health consequences.”

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Just a few days on a night shift schedule throws off protein rhythms related to blood glucose regulation, energy metabolism and inflammation, processes that can influence the development of chronic metabolic conditions.

The finding, from a study led by scientists at Washington State University and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, provides new clues as to why night shift workers are more prone to diabetes, obesity and other metabolic disorders.

“There are processes tied to the master biological clock in our brain that are saying that day is day and night is night and other processes that follow rhythms set elsewhere in the body that say night is day and day is night,” said senior study author Hans Van Dongen, a professor in the WSU Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. “When internal rhythms are dysregulated, you have this enduring stress in your system that we believe has long-term health consequences.”

Though more research is needed, Van Dongen said the study shows that these disrupted rhythms can be seen in as little as three days, which suggests early intervention to prevent diabetes and obesity is possible. Such intervention could also help lower the risk of heart disease and stroke, which is elevated in night shift workers as well.

Published in the Journal of Proteome Research, the study involved a controlled laboratory experiment with volunteers who were put on simulated night or day shift schedules for three days. Following their last shift, participants were kept awake for 24 hours under constant conditions—lighting, temperature, posture and food intake—to measure their internal biological rhythms without interference from outside influences. 

Blood samples drawn at regular intervals throughout the 24-hour period were analyzed to identify proteins present in blood-based immune system cells. Some proteins had rhythms closely tied to the master biological clock, which keeps the body on a 24-hour rhythm. The master clock is resilient to altered shift schedules, so these protein rhythms didn’t change much in response to the night shift schedule.

However, most other proteins had rhythms that changed substantially in night shift participants compared to the day shift participants.

Looking more closely at proteins involved in glucose regulation, the researchers observed a nearly complete reversal of glucose rhythms in night shift participants. They also found that processes involved in insulin production and sensitivity, which normally work together to keep glucose levels within a healthy range, were no longer synchronized in night shift participants.

The researchers said this effect could be caused by the regulation of insulin trying to undo the glucose changes triggered by the night shift schedule. They said this may be a healthy response in the moment, as altered glucose levels may damage cells and organs, but could be problematic in the long run.

“What we showed is that we can really see a difference in molecular patterns between volunteers with normal schedules and those with schedules that are misaligned with their biological clock,” said Jason McDermott, a computational scientist with PNNL’s Biological Sciences Division. “The effects of this misalignment had not yet been characterized at this molecular level and in this controlled manner before.”

The researchers’ next step will be to study real-world workers to determine whether night shifts cause similar protein changes in long-term shift workers.

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