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Nutrition

Add powerful pairings to your plate

These recipes call for pulses, which include lentils, chickpeas dry peas, and beans; sorghum, similar to rice or quinoa filled with nutrients, texture and taste; and pork, rich in flavor, versatile and sustainable with nutritious qualities.

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Joining loved ones at the family table is an important moment for many, both as a filling way to enjoy a meal and an emotionally satisfying way to catch up on all the day’s events. Make those moments count by combining nutritious ingredients and creating recipes that can quickly become favorites.

As part of the Powerful Pairings initiative – launched by the United Sorghum Checkoff Program, National Pork Board and USA Pulses – these recipes call for pulses, which include lentils, chickpeas dry peas, and beans; sorghum, similar to rice or quinoa filled with nutrients, texture and taste; and pork, rich in flavor, versatile and sustainable with nutritious qualities.

Combined, these three ingredients can work together in sweet and savory dishes alike, and they shine with a multitude of herbs, spices and sauces from around the world. A powerhouse nutritional trio, they include foods from the protein, vegetable and grain groups outlined in MyPlate, a template for balance, variety and moderation.

Plus, the taste and versatility of these ingredients make it easier to achieve more family meals, which promotes cohesion, communication and relationships, helping loved ones celebrate simple joys together and be more prepared for uncertainty and difficult life moments.

Find more information, resources and recipes at powerfulpairings.com.

Mediterranean Grain Bowl with Pork Skewers

Recipe courtesy of the United Sorghum Checkoff Program, National Pork Board and USA Pulses

Prep time: 45 minutes, plus 2 hours marinate time

Cook time: 75 minutes

Servings: 6 (1 pork skewer, 2/3 cup sorghum, 2 tablespoons hummus)

Red Lentil Hummus:

            1 1/3    cups water

            1/3       cup dried red lentils

            1          tablespoon olive oil

            1          tablespoon tahini

            1          tablespoon lemon juice

            1/2       teaspoon minced garlic

            1/2       teaspoon cumin

            1/4       teaspoon salt

            1/4       teaspoon black pepper

            12        ounces pork loin roast, trimmed of fat

            4          tablespoons olive oil, divided

            2          teaspoons minced garlic

            1          teaspoon lemon zest

            1          teaspoon ground cumin

            1          teaspoon salt

            1/2       teaspoon black pepper

            1          sweet onion, chopped

            3          cups no-salt-added chicken stock

            3/4       cup whole-grain sorghum, rinsed and drained

            1          cup canned garbanzo beans (chickpeas), rinsed, drained and dried with paper towels

            1 1/2    cups halved cherry tomatoes

            1          cup arugula

            1          cup chopped cucumber

            2/3       cup crumbled feta cheese

            1/2       cup kalamata olives

To make Red Lentil Hummus: In small saucepan, combine water and dried red lentils; bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes, or until lentils split and become soft. Cool and transfer to food processor. Add olive oil, tahini, lemon juice, minced garlic, cumin, salt and black pepper; process 30-60 seconds, or until smooth, stopping to scrape down sides as needed. Transfer to airtight container and store in refrigerator up to 5 days until serving time.

Cut pork loin into 1-inch cubes. Place in re-sealable plastic bag set in shallow dish. In small bowl, combine 3 tablespoons olive oil, garlic, lemon zest, cumin, salt and black pepper. Pour half olive oil mixture over meat, reserving remaining half. Seal bag; turn to coat meat. Marinate in refrigerator 2 hours, turning bag occasionally.

In medium saucepan, heat remaining olive oil over medium-high heat. Add onion, cook and stir 6-8 minutes, or until tender. Add stock and bring to boil. Add sorghum. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, 45-60 minutes, or until sorghum is tender, stirring occasionally.

Preheat oven to 400 F.

Arrange chickpeas on foil-lined 15-by-10-by-1-inch baking pan. Drizzle with reserved olive oil mixture; toss to coat. Roast 20-30 minutes, or until chickpeas are toasted and crispy, stirring occasionally. Remove from oven and increase oven to 500 F.

Drain meat, discarding marinade. Divide among six wooden or metal skewers. Arrange skewers on wire rack on baking sheet and bake 10 minutes, or until meat is slightly pink in center, turning once halfway through.

To serve, divide cooked sorghum between six shallow bowls. Top with tomatoes, arugula, cucumber, feta cheese, olives, chickpeas and Red Lentil Hummus. Serve with pork skewers.

Nutritional information per serving: 505 calories; 28 g total fat (8 g saturated fat); 14 mg cholesterol; 528 mg sodium; 43 g total carbohydrates (8 g dietary fiber, 6 g sugars); 23 g protein; 1% vitamin D; 15% calcium; 19% iron; 16% potassium; 361 mg phosphorus (29%).

Sorghum Split Pea Soup

Recipe courtesy of the United Sorghum Checkoff Program, National Pork Board and USA Pulses

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 60 minutes

Servings: 6 (1 1/4 cup each)

            1 1/2    tablespoons olive oil

            1          onion, chopped

            3/4       cup sliced carrots

            3/4       cup sliced celery

                        salt, to taste

                        pepper, to taste

            1 1/2    teaspoons minced garlic

            6          cups no-salt-added chicken stock

            1 1/4    cups green split peas

            1          small ham bone

            2/3       cup chopped ham

            2/3       cup pearled sorghum

            4          sprigs thyme

            2          bay leaves

            1 1/2    tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

                        chopped fresh thyme (optional)

                        cracked black pepper (optional)

In 4-quart stock pot or large pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion, carrots, celery and garlic; season with salt and pepper, to taste, and cook, stirring occasionally, 10-12 minutes, or until onion is tender. Add chicken stock, split peas, ham bone, ham, sorghum, thyme sprigs and bay leaves. Bring to boil; reduce heat and simmer, covered, 45-60 minutes, or until split peas are soft and sorghum is tender.

Remove ham bone, thyme sprigs and bay leaves from soup. Remove ham from bone, chop ham and return to pot. Discard bone, thyme sprigs and bay leaves. Add Worcestershire sauce and season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Garnish with chopped fresh thyme and cracked black pepper, if desired.

Nutritional information per serving: 336 calories; 8 g total fat (2 g saturated fat); 22 mg cholesterol; 573 mg sodium; 48 g total carbohydrates (12 g dietary fiber, 7 g sugars); 20 g protein; 3% vitamin D; 5% calcium; 17% iron; 19% potassium; 227 mg phosphorus (18%).

Lemon-Garlic Tenderloin with Warm Sorghum Salad

Recipe courtesy of the United Sorghum Checkoff Program, National Pork Board and USA Pulses

Prep time: 25 minutes

Cook time: 70 minutes

Servings: 6 (2 ounces pork, 3/4 cup sorghum salad)

            2          cups vegetable broth

            2          cups water

            1          cup whole-grain sorghum

            2          tablespoons olive oil

            1          tablespoon minced garlic

            1          tablespoon minced fresh parsley

            1 1/2    teaspoons lemon zest

            1/2       teaspoon salt

            1/2       teaspoon pepper

            1          pork tenderloin (16 ounces), trimmed of fat

            1          medium sweet potato, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch pieces

            1          cup kidney beans, rinsed and drained

            1/2       cup dried cranberries

            1/2       cup pecan halves

Preheat oven to 425 F. In medium saucepan, combine vegetable broth and water. Bring to boil. Add sorghum. Reduce heat to simmer and cook, covered, 45-60 minutes, or until tender.

In medium bowl, combine olive oil, garlic, parsley, lemon zest, salt and pepper. Drizzle half oil mixture on pork; rub in with fingers. Place pork in shallow roasting pan. Add sweet potatoes to bowl with remaining oil mixture. Toss to coat and set aside.

Roast pork, uncovered, 10 minutes. Arrange sweet potatoes around pork and roast 15-20 minutes, or until pork reaches 145 F internal temperature and potatoes are tender. Remove pork from pan. Cover; let stand 10 minutes.

Stir roasted sweet potatoes, beans, cranberries and pecan halves into cooked sorghum and heat through.

Slice pork tenderloin and serve with warm sorghum salad.

Nutritional information per serving: 436 calories; 15 g total fat (2 g saturated fat); 55 mg cholesterol; 369 mg sodium; 55 g total carbohydrates (8 g dietary fiber, 16 g sugars); 25 g protein; 2% vitamin D; 6% calcium; 20% iron; 20% potassium; 377 mg phosphorus (30%).

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Nutrition

Protein-rich breakfast boosts satiety and concentration

A rotein-rich breakfast with skyr (a sour-milk product) and oats increased satiety and concentration in the participants, but it did not reduce the overall energy intake compared to skipping breakfast or eating a carbohydrate-rich breakfast.

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A new Danish study has explored the link between diet and cognitive function, and the results reveal that a protein-rich breakfast can increase satiety and improve concentration. This is important knowledge in a society with increasing obesity rates and lifestyle-related diseases, says researcher.

“Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.” This is a well-worn platitude that has never had much basis in scientific evidence.

But a new Danish study has explored how different types of breakfast affect satiety and concentration and it has added new fuel to the old cliché.

The study followed 30 obese women aged 18 to 30 for three days, during which the women consumed a protein-rich breakfast, a carbohydrate-rich breakfast or no breakfast at all. The women’s sense of satiety, hormone levels and energy intake were measured at lunchtime. Their total daily energy intake was measured as well.

The participants also had to complete a cognitive concentration test during the study.

“We found that a protein-rich breakfast with skyr (a sour-milk product) and oats increased satiety and concentration in the participants, but it did not reduce the overall energy intake compared to skipping breakfast or eating a carbohydrate-rich breakfast,” says Mette Hansen, associate professor and PhD at the Department of Public Health, and one of the authors of the study.

Possible strategy to combat obesity?

The number of overweight people is increasing both in Denmark and across the globe. Obesity is often accompanied by lifestyle-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes.

Previous studies have shown that people who eat breakfast have a lower BMI than people who do not eat breakfast, and protein-rich foods have generally been shown to have an increased satiety effect compared to carbohydrate-rich and high-fat foods with the same calorie content.

The idea was therefore to test whether a protein-rich breakfast could be a good strategy to achieving greater satiety during the day and thus reducing daily calorie intake.

However, the solution is not that simple, says Mette Hansen:

“The results confirm that protein-rich meals increase a sense of satiety, which is positive with regard to preventing weight gain. However, the results also suggest that for this nutritional strategy to be effective, it’s not enough to just eat a protein-rich breakfast.”

Intriguing difference

The potential of replacing a carbohydrate-rich diet with a protein-rich diet can clearly be seen in the satiating effects measured in the study.

Several of the subjects had difficulty consuming the entire protein-rich breakfast consisting of skyr and oats.

“It’s intriguing that there can be such a big difference in the satiety effect of two different meals with the same calorie content. Had the women in the project been allowed to choose the size of the meal themselves, it’s likely that they’d have consumed more food and thereby more calories on the day

they were served bread and jam than on the day they were given skyr and oats,” explains Mette Hansen.

Further research needed

According to the researcher, although the study has provided important insights, it also has its limitations because only overweight young women participated in the study. The study is also based on relatively short-term observations, leaving open the question of how long-term dietary changes can affect health and weight.

Mette Hansen therefore points out that the study underlines the need for further research to understand how different types of food affect health over time.

“We already have new data incoming from a trial where participants received either a high-protein breakfast or a low-protein breakfast. The objective was to study how the different types of breakfast affect body composition and other parameters such as microbiota and cholesterol levels,” says Mette Hansen.

According to Mette Hansen, the results of these studies may result in the development of more targeted nutritional recommendations in the future.

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Nutrition

10 Vitamins and minerals needed by your body

This article will give you a quick guide on the top 10 vitamins and minerals needed by the body and the problem areas they address according to pharmaceutical experts.

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Going from place to place and chasing one task after another, you might think that you’re already doing enough to keep your body moving and your health goals on track. But having an active lifestyle does not automatically equate to living a completely healthy life. It must be supplemented with the correct vitamins and minerals for our body to function at its best. Therefore, a thorough understanding of these components is necessary. For all efforts in building an active and healthy lifestyle will be in vain if we are not knowledgeable with what kinds of vitamins and minerals must go in our body and how they correspond to our daily needs. 

This article will give you a quick guide on the top 10 vitamins and minerals needed by the body and the problem areas they address according to pharmaceutical experts.

  1. Vitamin A is known to maintain a strong heart, immunity, and eye and lung health thus addressing all problems related to these.  
  2. Vitamin B is in charge of converting macro and micronutrients such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins into energy. Therefore, it is necessary for healthy metabolism as well as cell development, growth, and function. It also ensures the peak condition of our hair and nails. Vitamin B helps with problems involving the nervous and digestive system, the brain, and the skin. 
  3. Vitamin C is among the most heard vitamins on the list. It helps the immune system and increases iron absorption from plant-based foods and supplements. Since it’s an antioxidant, vitamin C protects our cells from damaging free radicals. It also aids in wound healing by helping our body produce collagen. Hence, vitamin C is helpful in maintaining healthy veins and arteries, muscles, cartilage, tendons, bones, teeth, and skin. 
  4. Vitamin D builds strong bones by helping our body absorb calcium from food and supplements. It also boosts the functioning of the immune system while supporting healthy cell growth as well as muscle and cardiovascular function. 
  5. Vitamin E helps defend our cells against the oxidative stress caused by sunlight, pollution, and stress which can prematurely age the skin. When combined with zinc, beta-carotene, and vitamin C, vitamin E also help maintain long-term eye health.
  6. Zinc is an essential mineral that plays an important role in immune function and is essential for normal growth and development during pregnancy and childhood. It is an antioxidant that plays a vital role in overall health. It is mostly involved in many processes, including metabolism, vision and skin health. Zinc also appears to provide support to other antioxidants involved in supporting visual acuity.
  7. Sodium plays a critical role in helping your cells maintain the right balance of fluid. It’s also used to help cells absorb nutrients. It’s the most abundant electrolyte ion found in the body. It is an essential mineral controlled by your kidneys and partially responsible for keeping your body’s fluids in balance. This includes blood plasma and the fluid between your cells. Sodium is also necessary to maintain healthy muscle and nerve function.
  8. Potassium allows the nerves to respond to stimulation and the muscles to tighten, which are processes especially critical to your heart function. Your body also needs potassium to build proteins and muscles. It’s required for growth throughout your body and helps regulate the use of carbohydrates. Potassium is abundant in the average diet. 
  9. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and is crucial for structural support. It is necessary for healthy bones, teeth, muscle, and nerve function. It is also a critical part of many metabolic, neurological and muscular functions. 
  10. Magnesium helps more than 300 enzymes that regulate various processes in the body, including muscle and nerve function, heart rhythms and glucose control. Magnesium is critical for helping the body use calcium and vitamin D so that it can strengthen the bones. It also supports energy production and cardiovascular function.

It seems daunting to remember the importance of these 10 vitamins and minerals. But there are various sources from which they can be acquired such as meal replacement shakes. USANA Philippines offers a variety of meal replacement shakes under their active nutrition line namely: Nutrimeal, Fibergy Active, and Watermelon Electrolyte Replacement Drink. All of which takes less than a minute to prepare. In quick and easy steps, people on the go will be able to secure the nutrients they need and move with ease.  

Indeed, it is important to know what our body needs to keep us healthy and active. But the process does not stop there. It is what you do with the information you gained that will affect the results. What will you do now?

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Nutrition

Benefits of swapping some meat intake with walnuts

New research suggests that walnuts, when substituted for meat, may improve diet quality, support cardiovascular health and lower the risk for developing type 2 diabetes and overall all-cause mortality.

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Food trends are constantly evolving and one of the most exciting trends for 2024 is focused on putting the “plant” back in “plant-based”.

One easy way to include more plant-based foods in the diet is considering walnuts as a partial replacement for meat in a meal or snack for added nutrition benefits. Walnuts are a versatile, nutritious, and delicious plant-based protein option that works well with a variety of global sweet or savory flavors and pairs well with other ingredients. Walnuts also have the ability to take on the texture and consistency of ground meat, allowing for seamless integration into a variety of recipes.

New research suggests that walnuts, when substituted for meat, may improve diet quality, support cardiovascular health and lower the risk for developing type 2 diabetes and overall all-cause mortality.

In a recent modeling study published in Nutrients, an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal of human nutrition and funded by the California Walnut Commission, researchers examined the potential benefits to nutrient intake and diet quality by replacing some meat in the diet with walnuts. The researchers used data from the 2015 – 2018 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), to model the nutrient intake of the US population with and without walnuts. Specifically, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 ounces of walnuts per day replaced 1, 2, 3 and 4 ounces of meat.

The modeling study found that the partial replacement of meat with walnuts in the diet:2

  • Improved the overall diet quality.
  • Increased intake of omega-3 ALA, fiber, magnesium and copper. 
  • Significantly decreased cholesterol and vitamin B12.
    • Important to note: all age and gender groups maintained vitamin B12 intake above the recommended daily allowance when replacing 2–3 ounces of meat with walnuts.

Notably, the study found that replacing just 1 – 1.5 oz of meat with walnuts may improve the dietary intake of some nutrients, such as dietary fiber, magnesium, and “good” polyunsaturated fatty acids, including omega-3 ALA, and may decrease the intake of cholesterol among the US population. The study also found that all age and gender groups may benefit from incorporating walnuts into their diets.*

“It’s no surprise that there are benefits to eating more plant-based foods. What’s most encouraging to see, however, is that these benefits can occur by including something as simple, easy-to-find, and versatile as nuts, like walnuts, in the diet,” said Dr. Wendy Bazilian, DrPH, RDN. “Of course, we know that the many positive attributes of walnuts are already supported by more than three decades of health-related research examining the effect of consumption on areas of whole-body health. And now, we’re seeing the impressive effects that simple swaps from animal-based products can make when nutritious and tasty walnuts are used.”

Swaps to Unlock the Walnut Effect

A few examples of plant-based meat swaps with walnuts include:

  • For meatless Mondays or plant-based taco Tuesdays, swap out ground beef or turkey for walnut chorizo, as Walnut “Chorizo” Tacos with Pickled Vegetables provide a satisfying, nutritious crumble in tacos. The combination of spicy walnut chorizo with tangy pickled vegetables is mouthwateringly good.
  • Give the classic pasta night a twist by adding flavor and texture from walnuts with this Pappardelle with California Walnut Pesto. 
  • Prepping a big batch of sweet potato walnut falafels ahead of time makes mealtime easy throughout the week with Sweet Potato Walnut Falafel Bowls. A maple tahini sauce keeps things interesting on this plant-based dish and try switching up the grains and vegetables for versatility.
  • Elevate the ultimate comfort – meatballs! These California Walnut Meatless Meatballs are great with pasta, slathered in marinara or in some California Walnut Muhammara sauce. Or Coconut Curry Lentil and Walnut Meatballs which are built with lentils and walnuts and a simple, aromatic coconut curry sauce served over hearty grains and sautéed vegetables, is a well-balanced, delicious plant-forward meal.

Some tips include:

  •  Prepare a single batch of “walnut meat” and use it across several meals throughout the week.
  • To ensure the freshness of “walnut meat,” store it in an airtight container in the fridge for up to four days or freeze it for longer-term storage.

A 1-ounce serving of walnuts, the equivalent of a handful, provides a powerhouse of important nutrients for optimum health, including:3

  • An excellent source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-based omega-3 fatty acid (2.5g) – the only nut with a significant amount.
  • 4g of protein
  • 2g of fiber
  • A good source of magnesium (45mg)
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